Shopping cart
is empty

Author Archives


Marcus Schenk

Marcus Schenk

Posts composed by Marcus Schenk

Only until the end of August: 6″ triplet carbon-fibre apochromat almost 800€ cheaper.

May 2 2019, Marcus Schenk

Bags of light, high resolution and pin-sharp stars: This Omegon 150mm aperture triplet apochromat provides you with a truly excellent image – clearly exceeding the performance of a reflecting telescope. The benefit to you – superb high-contrast observing. And astronomy photos that will delight both yourself and others.

One-off special offer for your dream apochromat – Purchase this Omegon 150/1500mm carbon-fibre triplet now for only 4999€ – saving you 791€!

 

Carbon APO

 

The advantages in a nutshell

  • ED glass triplet design apochromat – with 150mm aperture and 1000mm focal length
  • multi-coating – for high contrast and pinpoint star images
  • simple camera alignment – 360°, 2x rotatable 3″ focuser
  • carbon-fibre OTA – rigid and durable design
  • sturdy tube-ring clamps plus case included

This 6″ carbon-fibre triplet apochromat comes in two versions

  1. Omegon Pro APO 6″ ED triplet carbon-fibre OTA now for only 4999€
  2. Omegon Pro APO 6″ ED triplet carbon-fibre OTA with field flattener now for only 5199€

 

You can also request a test report for your apochromat – for a certificate demonstrating the high quality of this telescope.

Testprotokoll des Omegon APO Triplet 150/1000mm

Perfect for ambitious amateur astronomers, clubs and observatories – buy your apochromat now. Or let our experts advise you.

This special offer is valid until 31.08.2019.

Special Price: 76/700 AZ-1 Telescope almost 30% Discount

April 2 2019, Marcus Schenk

A photograph cannot beat a real look into the night sky.  With the Newton Telescope 76/700 AZ-1, you can experience the starry night sky live and with your own eyes!  This little beginner telescope can offer kids and adults their first contact with the Moon and planets.

Save almost 30%! Get your hands on the Omegon 76/700 AZ-1 Telescope now for only 69.90 Euros instead of 99 Euros!

 76/700 Set

 

Take a stroll across the Moon with this telescope.  It feels as if you are floating in a spaceship over the surface of the Moon.  How would it be to have a glance a Tycho?  A crate with a diameter of 90 km and a crater wall of almost 5,000 meters high.  Once, the scraps of a massive collision flew about the area, and spread the lunar stone far around the Moonscape.

Experience the lunar Mare (seas) with this telescope, as well as thousands of craters or the lunar Alps.  Throughout the year, you will be able to experience something new on the Moon again and again.  Always excited!  A trip through the Universe for the whole family.

 

The Advantages in a Nutshell:

  • Complete telescope set, including Tube, Mount and Tripod
  • Tripod is adjustable: great for children and adults
  • Simple use: Azimuthal mount with easy navigation through the sky
  • Collects 118 times more light than the naked eye
  • For observing the Moon or bright planets

This telescope is waiting for you to take it out for its first look at the Moon: Order the Telescope now or go for the more comprehensive Beginner Set with Star Chart, Book and Lunar Filter.

The offer is valid until 31.05.2019.

Spring sale up to 30% savings on Omegon binoculars

March 18 2019, Marcus Schenk

Spring sale – up to 30% savings on Omegon binoculars

Spring is coming, and what could be better than a spot of nature-watching? Birds fluttering between branches, the sparkling water of a stream or stargazing – Omegon binoculars let you enjoy razor-sharp views of nature.

You can now save 30% on almost all Omegon binoculars.

You can also save 20% on the Nightstar, Brightsky and Argus series. Grab the opportunity – make use of this sale to get yourself a new set of binoculars!

 

 

Three product highlights – for Astronomy, Nature- and birdwatching

 

Omegon Hunter, a diamond in the rough world of binoculars – enjoy all its advantages

OMEGON Hunter 8×56 – a powerful instrument for nature-watching, hunting or astronomy. The 56mm aperture lenses collect 64 times more light than the naked eye to provide an extremely bright image, as only binoculars of this size can. These binoculars are perfect for use at twilight or even in conditions of unfavourable lighting.

Omegon Hunter

Omegon Hunter 8×56

 

Omegon Brightsky binoculars – a tough all-rounder for nature and sky

Omegon Brightsky binoculars are powerful instruments for observing the night sky and are great to take along on any outdoor adventure. Their robust workmanship means they simply shrug off the wind and weather. But their optics also have a lot to offer – a stunning image.

Omegon Brightsky 15x70

Omegon Brightsky 15×70

 

Omegon Nature HD – For nature-watching in HD quality

Omegon Nature HD instruments are powerful binoculars with HD optics. The use of special ED glass and phase-coating ensures an impressive visual experience. Their magnesium housing and nitrogen filling make these binoculars that you will want to have with you at all times. Perfectly balanced, these are binoculars for nature- and birdwatchers, hunters and hikers.

Omegon Nature HD

Omegon Nature HD

 

 

Grab yourself a pair of these attractively priced binoculars from the series and benefit from our generous discount.

Now take a look at our Omegon binoculars section. After this offer expires, normal prices will apply once more.

This offer is valid until 31 May 2019.

Is a Dobsonian telescope right for me? | with product recommendations

December 30 2018, Marcus Schenk

A simple Dobsonian or a GoTo telescope? – a question whose answer you first have to decide on. You should also choose your telescope based on what you would like to observe or experience in the night sky.

Did you know that there is also a system with something like ‘a bit of GoTo’?

But how do you find out if a Dobsonian telescope is right for you? In Part 1 of this post, we’ve put together a few questions to help you find your preferences.

Following on, in part 2, there are product recommendations for three different telescope series, with you can use to explore the night sky.

 

Part 1

Are you an observer for whom a Dobsonian telescope is suitable? Or do you need a telescope with an equatorial mount? Decide which using the following questions:

 

1. Do you only want to observe or also to take photos?

There are two types of observing: the visual and photographic. Which do you prefer? If you are a visual observer, then a Dobsonian would probably be the right choice.

1 Yes I want to observe visually.
2 I do not know yet, maybe both.
3 Taking photos is more important to me than observing visually.

 

2. What do you value more? – the optics or the mechanics and electronics?

Dobsonian telescopes consist of a wooden box with plain bearings, called a ‘Rockerbox’, and a Newtonian mirror OTA. A clear emphasis here is placed on a larger OTA diameter. The mechanics remain simple. The advantage – you get a large aperture telescope for relatively little outlay, with which you can observe a lot.

1 I put more emphasis on a great optics for a low price.
2 I cannot commit myself, maybe both.
3 I am a fan of complex mechanics that controls my telescope via slow motions and worm gears.

 

3. Quick assembly or precise alignment?

Dobsonian telescopes consist of only two parts. The advantage – just two parts can be quickly transported and reassembled at the observing site. They are often much quicker to put together than a telescope with a tripod, equatorial mount, several counterweights and the OTA itself. You do not have to align a Dobsonian telescope to the celestial north pole, you are tracking in both axes’ directions.

1 I want to set up my telescope quickly, I can’t be bothered with all the complexity of assembling and observing with an equatorial set up.
2 I would like to have GoTo, but only if the setup does not take too long.
3 I’d rather spend more time putting the system together and precisely aligning it.

 

4. Do you prefer observing the Moon and planets, or observing galaxies?

A medium to large Newtonian telescope is of course also suitable for planetary observing. But the strengths of a large mirror lie in its greater light-gathering power. This makes many Dobsonian telescopes suitable for observing nebulae and galaxies. Bu if you are more interested in the Moon and planets, then a refractor telescope would be the better choice.

1 I want to observe nebulae and galaxies.
2 I want to observe nebulae and galaxies, but how am I supposed to find them?
3 I am interested in the Moon and the planets, but there is so much light pollution where I live that I cannot observe galaxies very well. An automated telescope would have to find them.

 

5. Exploring the night sky with a star map or using a GoTo system?

Dobsonian telescopes are almost always manually controlled instruments. In other words, there is no GoTo system here that slews to objects at the push of a button. You have to guide the telescope purely manually to the object of your choice with the help of a star map and then track it manually. But what is the advantage of that? Quite simply – the night sky will eventually become your familiar hunting ground that you know like the back of your hand. You’ll become a real expert at finding deep sky objects. And you will develop a feeling for tracking objects. The other thing is that it’s a lot of fun, and every time you find an object there is that little thrill of achievement.

1 Of course, I want to find the objects myself using a Dobsonian telescope.
2 I’m afraid that I’m not so good at orienting myself.
3 I’m not really interested in star hopping – there are GoTo telescopes for finding astronomical objects.

 

6. Naturally experiencing the night sky using only a little technology?

Observers repeatedly report that they can enjoy a natural experience to the maximum with a Dobsonian telescope. There is no complicated technology here that needs to be made to work. No, naturally experiencing the night sky without any motor noise is the most important thing.

1 I want to visibly experience the night sky in a clear simple and natural way.
2 I would like to be able to to add a little technology if I want.
3 No, this manual control idea is not for me. State-of-the-art technology and GoTo systems would be my first choice.

 

Your answers

If you answered most questions with a 1, then you are definitely a ‘Dobsonau’. You should immediately buy a Dobsonian telescope – perhaps one of the three examples detailed below?

If you’ve answered most questions with a 2, then you’d like to observe with a Dobsonian, but GoTo systems also tempt you. The Onmegon Push+ Telescope with object navigator (see below) would be the way to go.

If you answered most questions with a 3, then you’d better use a GoTo system. Here, we have a large selection.

 

Part 2

We have three Dobsonian telescopes in our program: the Omegon Advanced X Dobsonian telescope for beginners, the Omegon ProDob for intermediates and experts and the Omegon Push+ with push-to-technology.

 

Omegon Advanced X Dobsonian telescope – for getting into deep sky observing

These telescopes are a great way to start visual deep sky observing. Explore star clusters, hydrogen nebulae, planetary nebulae, and even galaxies with their spiral arms. With a 200mm lens aperture, this telescope will show you hundreds of interesting objects. If you want even more light, you can also use the Omegon Advanced X N 254/1200 or a real ‘light cannon’, the Omegon Advanced X N 304/1500. Of course, ‘excursions’ to the Moon and the planets are also possible.

If you do not want to spend a lot of money, but are looking for a great value-for-money telescope, then an Omegon Advanced X is the instrument for you.

Omegon Advanced X 203/1200

The Omegon ProDob – deluxe Dobsonian with an excellent friction system

ProDob Dobson telescopes come with a particularly good 2″ Crayford focuser and a deluxe friction system. Once an object is centred in the eyepiece, tracking is even more accurate and precise – even at very high magnifications. There is no juddering or anything (as with instruments with Teflon bearings), as when slewing the telescope it almost floats to the next object. The reason for this is a ball-bearing system in the elevation axis and roller-bearings in azimuth. And also, the friction level can be set to your needs. High magnifications are also possible with a Dobsonian.

Omegon Dobson Teleskop ProDob N 203/1200

The ProDob from Omegon comes in a range of apertures:
– ProDob N203/1200 with 8“ diameter
– ProDob N254/1200 with 10“ diameter
– ProDob N304/1500 with 12“ diameter
– ProDob N406/1850 with 16“ diameter

 

Omgeon Push+ – control a Dobsonian telescope using your smartphone

With the Omegon Push+ Dobsonian, you can travel to the planets, nebulae and galaxies in the universe whenever you wish. You do not even need to be very knowledgeable about the night sky, because the telescope guides you using a push-to-system to any object you wish to observe. All you need is an Android smartphone and the SkySafari 4.0 app.

The Omegon Push+ and Push+ Mini telescopes bridge the gap between a purely manual Dobsonian and a GoTo telescope. So to speak: ‘A bit of Goto’, so to speak – as the Push+ can still be slewed manually, as is common with Dobsonian telescopes, but also using your smartphone and built-in fine-step encoder in the telescope,

The high-resolution encoders allow the system to take you to any astronomical object you desire. Your smartphone functions as a display screen and at the same time orients you in the night sky. A crosshair shows you the position of your telescope in real time. You can decide, at any time, whether you want to use the push-to-system or prefer to control the telescope completely manually – it’s nice to have the choice!

Omegon Dobson Teleskop Push+ mini N 150/750 Pro

The Omegon Push+ is available with a 200mm (8″) OTA or as a Push+ Mini with a 150mm (6″) OTA:

Omegon Push+ mini N 150/750 Pro Dobsonian telescope
Omegon Push+ mini N 150/750 Dobsonian telescope
Omegon Push+ mini N 150/750 Skywatcher Dobsonian telescope

Omegon MiniTrack LX2 Receives „Hot Product 2019“ Award

December 10 2018, Marcus Schenk

The Omegon MiniTrack LX2 is the world’s first fully-mechanical photo mount for wide-field astrophotography.  With just a simple twist, you can capture amazing photos of the Milky Way.  This year the LX2 has received the much coveted astronomy award “Hot Product 2019” that the magazine Sky & Telescope awards annually to especially innovative products.

The Omegon Mini Track LX2 (or the set with the photography ball-head) makes a great gift for beginners and nature photographers, who would like to capture the night sky along with an amazing landscape.  If you have already tried with traditional means, but have not been satisfied with the results, the Mini Track LX2 is much simpler.  The proof is easy to see, if you look at the many amazing photos take with the LX2 and posted on social media.

More info about the Mini Track LX2 mount is available here. Gift-giving during this holiday season will be a piece of cake with the Mini Track LX2.

 

Below, you can read up on other, special products in our assortment, which have also received the “Hot Product” seal of approval:

The Mead Deep Sky Imager IV

The new and improved Planetary and Deep Sky Camera from Meade has convinced reviewers.  With a 16 megapixel Panasonic CMOS-Sensor, thermoelectric cooling, USB 3.0 and 3.8 µm pixels, the camera is a strong multi-use device for astrophotographers, who want to limits in their photography.  The new Deep-Sky-Imager IV is available in color or monochrome.  The software SkyCapture makes other programs superfluous and you can use if for all your photographic purposes.  The software runs on Windows and MacOS, as well as Linux.

Meade Deep-Sky-Imager DSI IV

Meade Deep-Sky-Imager DSI IV

 

Hubble Optics N 607/2012 UL24 f/3.3 Premium Ultra-Light DOB

“BIG DOB TO GO” is the moniker Sky & Telescope gave to the huge 24” Truss Dobson from Hubble Optics.  And for good reason.  The telescope can be broken down into individual pieces and transported in even the most compact vehicles.  Just imagine taking a telescope, as big as in many observatories, to the mountains or to a nice dark pasture.  You are sure to have quite the stargazing experience!

 

Hubble Optics Dobson Teleskop N 607/2012 UL24 f/3.3 Premium Ultra Light DOB

The Hubble Optics Ultra Light Dob with 607mm Aperture

 

Celestron Telescope Astrograph S 203/400 RASA 800 OTA

A digital Schmidt Camera for wide-angle photos!  The Celestron Astrograph RASA takes photos 20 times faster, than a Schmidt-Cassergrain Telescope.  The results are awe-inspiring photos of large-scale celestial objects. In 30 seconds, you can capture, what would require 10 minutes with a f/10 telescope.

 

RASA 8

The Astrograph 203/400mm RASA

 

iOptron Mount CEM120 GoTo

The heaviest mount from iOptron can handle instruments up to 52 kg and is fully LAN and Wifi remote capable.  In spite of its size, the mount moves smoothly like a hot knife through butter.

CEM 120 Montierung

The heavy-duty CEM 120 Mount

 

Daystar SS60-DS Solar Telescope

A compact solar telescope with 60mm aperture for safe solar viewing in H-alpha.  Daystar integrated a double stack Etalon Filter from the QUARK series into this refractor, which meanwhile has written a little success story of its own in solar observing.  Here, you get everything in one package, with which you can see solar protuberances, filaments and flares – everything that raises the pulse of a solar observer.  Attaching a camera to the helical focuser and you can capture your observations for good.

Daystar Sonnenteleskop SS60-DS

DayStar-Solar Telescope ST 60/930mm SolarScout SS60-DS H-Alpha

 

Celestron Smartphone Adapter

The easy way to connect your smartphone to your telescope with the Celestron Smartphone Adapter, which can be adjusted with precision on three axes.  Now you can easily position your smartphone’s camera over the eyepiece.

Celetron Smartphone Halterung

Celetron Smartphone Adapter NexYZ

 

 

Lunatico Pocket CloudWatcher

The Pocket CloudWatcher keeps an eye on the clouds on your behalf.  This weather and cloud detection device, which alerts you, when something changes in the sky.  The mobile CloudWatcher measures temperatures, brightness, relative humidity, dewpoint and alerts you immediately on your smartphone, when clouds move in.  The perfect gift for astrophotographers.

Cloud Watcher

Lunatico Pocket CloudWatcher

 

A few years ago, but still a great device:

Hot Product 2017: Universe2go

This AR Planetarium, which shows you and simultaneously explains the night sky.  There is no need to spend your time with star charts and books.  Universe2go is like a visit to the planetarium, but all in a handheld viewer that augments your reality.  Just download the free app, put your smartphone into the viewer and look up into the night sky.  The magazine Sky & Telescope was so enthusiastic about Universe2go that it received the Hot Product 2017 Award.

 

Omegon Handheld Planetarium Universe2go

The advantages?

  • Your impression of the real starry night sky gets an overhaul with a superimposed digital picture.
  • Learn about all 88 constellations and numerous celestial objects
  • Where are the planets? With Universe2go, you can find them all!
  • Over 3 hours of audio explanations, which will make you an expert of the night sky.
  • Many more features!

In the current issue, Sky & Telescope introduced many more products in the Hot Product category.

 

Comet 46P/Wirtanen: How to See the Christmas Comet

December 5 2018, Marcus Schenk

After quite a while, we are finally going to get another visitor…. from SPACE!  The comet 46P/Wirtanen will approach Earth, becoming brighter and brighter, and will be visible to the naked eye.  But, a look through binoculars or telescope truly allows you to take in the comet’s beauty.  The best time to see the comet is between the beginning of December and the 25th of December.

 

This photo was taken with a Celestron Teleskop Astrograph S 203/400 RASA 800 OTA.  © Michael Jäger. Thanks to Celestron, who made the photo available to us.

A Comet with the Naked Eye?

46P/Wirtanen is a short-period comet which takes 5.5 years to come back around for another visit.  This December, however, is a special visit, since the comet will appear especially bright in the night sky.  If all goes as planned, Wirtanen’s brightness could reach the 3rd class and be easily visible to the naked eye, or better yet with a pair of binos.

 

If you haven’t yet seen a comet, then now is the right time!  A bright comet is one of the most enjoyable experiences in Astronomy.

 

Why will the comet be 160,000 times brighter?

So, what is so special about it? Only every few years, we have the pleasure of seeing a comet with the naked eye.  The last occurrence was 2014/15, when comet Lovejoy (C/2014 Q2) was visible to the naked eye for a short while at the end of the year.

Wirtanen has always been a weak comet.  But this year, we get a nice year-end present: excellent positioning.  As a result of a course correction, after a close encounter with the gas giant Jupiter, the comet’s orbit around the sun is now significantly closer to our star.  At the same time, the Earth is much closer to the comet’s orbit, making it appear brighter.  As a comparison: when discovered, 46P/Wirtanen was at a brightness of 16 mag.  When it passes by Earth, it will appear 160,000 times bright at 3 mag.

When and where can we see it?

Wirtanen will be visible in the evening sky throughout December.  On the 12th of December, it will reach its closest position to the Sun and on the 16th its closest position to the Earth at only 11 million km, roughly 30 times the distance from the Earth to the Moon.  Exactly at the point, in the evening of the 16th, the comet will reach its brightest point from Earth’s perspective, the so called perigee between the Pleiades and the Hyades.

The biggest obstacle will be the Moon spoiling the party and obscuring our view of the night sky and Wirtanen.  In the early morning hours, after the Moon sets, you will be able to catch a bit of the comet before it disappears below the horizon.

 

Find yourself a dark place

But wait, didn’t we say that the comet should be visible to the unaided eye?  Stars of a similar magnitude will also be visible, even when the Moon is bright in the sky.  Yes, but the magnitude of the comet is spread across a surface – the comet’s coma of roughly 0.5°.  As a comparison: that means the entire diameter of the Moon.  To get the best view, you should try to find a dark sport, away from man-made light, and wait until the Moon is out of the way.

Have a look first right after dusk.  At the beginning of December, the comet will hug the horizon, but climb higher and higher in the sky with each day.  On the 10th of December, it will arrive at the head of the Cetus or whale constellation and makes its way to Taurus.

From the 24th onward, you will be able to see the comet before the Moon rises in the sky. 46P/Wirtanen will then be found close to the star Capella in the constellation Auriga.  The early evening hours will give you the best chance of seeing it.  In the following days, the Moon will rise later and lunar-free periods will grow longer.

Better yet, get yourself some binoculars or a telescope

With binos or a telescope, the comet will appear much more impressive.  Take the time to check out the large green coma and if you have a telescope, even the little tail.  By the way: an excellent thing to have on hand is a pair of Omegon Wide-field Binoculars.

Take the chance now and check out, what some are calling “the Christmas Comet”.  Clear skies and have fun!

Infographic: Astronomy highlights in Winter 2018/2019

December 4 2018, Marcus Schenk

The new 3-month night sky calendar at a glance. The astronomical infographic ’Highlights of the Winter Sky 2018/2019’ shows you what will be happening in the night sky. Descriptions of the individual events are below:

05.12. The Moon near Mercury
Early in the morning, the Moon can be observed near Mercury. They are separated by about only 7 degrees – making them suitable for observing with a pair of wide-angle binoculars.

07.12. Mars near Neptune
A fantastic spectacle – a very close encounter between Mars and Neptune. Only about 4 arcminutes away from Neptune, Mars passes north of Neptune from around 18:00. You will need a pair of binoculars or, even better, a telescope to observe them.

13./14.12. Geminids
If the night sky is clear in the evening, then it is best to observe facing south, as the ‘Geminids’ meteor shower will seem to come from the constellation of the ‘twins’ – more precisely, from a point two degrees above the star Pollux. Between 21:00 and 6:00 is the best time to observe. With around 120 meteors per hour, the Geminids is one of the most intense showers. However, the full Moon will diminish the view this year. Even so, you really shouldn’t miss this event.

15.12. Moon near Mars
The 42% illuminated and waxing moon can be observed near Mars today, separated by a distance of about 5 degrees.

16.12. Comet 46P/Wirtanen
The December Comet – finally, we have a bright comet again, which can be observed with binoculars and small telescopes. Comet 46P/Wirtanen reaches its closest proximity to the Earth on the 16th and can be observed near the Pleiades (M45) open star cluster at only 3 degrees away. A beautiful ‘constellation‘ through binoculars. Wirtanen is a rare comet, which could attain a strong brightness and hence become an impressive object for beginners. If everything progresses well, it could reach a brightness of up to magnitude 4 by the end of the year and so even become visible to the naked eye. Without the disturbing presence of the Moon, the comet can be found easily in the evening sky after Christmas.

28.12. Hebe in opposition
The asteroid 6 HEBE comes into opposition on December 28, attaining a brightness of about magnitude 8.5. It can best be seen around midnight in the constellation of Monoceros or in the constellation of Orion. You will need a mid-size telescope to observe it. Its current position can be found at any time, by using the Stellarium planetarium program for example.

01.01. Planet chain Moon, Venus, Jupiter, Mercury
Just in time for New Year’s Eve, the New Year welcomes us with a pretty chain of planets. In the morning sky just before sunrise, you can see, from the top right to the bottom left to the horizon: the Moon, a bright Venus, Jupiter and even a shy Mercury close to the horizon. Tip: A great opportunity to take a beautiful photo.

04.01. Quardrantids
The next meteor shower is here – the Quadrantids. This shower comes from the constellation of Bootes, with the number of meteors observed across the sky potentially reaching a maximum of 120 per hour. Observing in the early morning will give you the best chance of successful observing.

05.01. Comet Wirtanen circumpolar
The Christmas Comet will also delight us in the new year – while the comet was only seen in the evening or in the morning sky before, it has now become circumpolar, wandering through the constellation of the Ursus Major. You can now observe it over the entire night.

06.01. Venus at greatest western elongation
The best view of Venus is now here. The ‘morning star’ shines brightly (magnitude -4.5). At 47 degrees angular separation, it is at greatest western elongation and can be seen half illuminated. The planet will first peep over the horizon at about 4:30 CET, and can be observed for about three hours before disappearing in the sunlight.

12.01. Moon near Mars
From dusk on, you can observe the Moon in the south with Mars above it. They are separated by about 7 degrees.

15.01. μ Cet occulted by the Moon (evening)
The Moon will occult the 4.1 mag star μ Cet in the very early evening. The Moon approaches the star with its dark side and finally occults it at 17:44 CET. An occultation from the Moon’s dark side is always fascinating to observe – it appears as though the star has suddenly been ‘switched off’. It will take almost an hour for the star to then reappear on the illuminated side of the Moon.

21.01. Total lunar eclipse
Everyone probably still remembers the Total Lunar Eclipse in 2018, when the Moon offered us a summer spectacle at a still-comfortable time of night. This time around the show is on the 21st of January, at a rather unfavourable time with temperatures that are too cold to be considered ‘T-shirt weather’.

Entry into the penumbra: 3:36 CET

Entry into the umbra: 4:33 CET

Beginning of totality: 5:40 CET

End of totality: 6:43 CET

Exits umbra: 7:50 CET

Exits penumbra: 8:48 CET

22.01. Venus near Jupiter
Jupiter and Venus can be observed together before sunrise. We can observe both planets shining in the southeast at a separation of only about 2 degrees. Venus is at magnitude -4.3, with Jupiter significantly weaker at magnitude -1.9. They provide a beautiful sight through binoculars, where you can admire them both in the same field of view.

31.01. Moon near Jupiter and Venus
On January 22nd the Moon joins the two planets, inserting itself in the middle between Venus and Jupiter.

02.02. Moon near Saturn (occulting in Germany and Austria)
The Moon is a waning ‘sickle’ and only 6% illuminated, so it is not visible until early in the morning. At 6.30 CET both astronomical bodies can be seen close to the horizon. The Moon can be seen to actually occult Saturn in both Germany and Austria – the ringed planet disappears behind the illuminated crescent moon at 6:37 CET, reappearing an hour later at the dark, north-eastern edge.

10.02. Moon near Mars
You can observe the crescent Moon and Mars together this evening in the same field of view in binoculars having a field of view of at least 7 degrees.

13.02. Mars near Uranus
Tonight, Mars will be less than 1.5 degrees away from the distant gas giant Uranus. The difference in brightness is significant – the red planet shines brightly at magnitude 1, whereas Uranus is only at a dim magnitude 5.8. Both objects can be observed using binoculars or a telescope. But it is definitely worthwhile – you can even see them together in the same field of view in a low magnification, wide-angle eyepiece.

27.02. Mercury at greatest eastern elongation (and half-full)
Because Mercury orbits so fast and so close to the Sun we cannot always observe it. But now Mercury is once again at a greater angular distance – of 18°- from the Sun. It’s not a huge separation, but it allows us to observe it for sufficient time during its half-full phase. Mercury can now be seen in the evening sky shortly after sunset. Be sure to wait until the sun has completely set before observing through any optics. You will then find Mercury just above the western horizon.

PDF here.

Omegon Panorama II 100° [Product Test]: The Experts Unveil Their Thoughts

October 31 2018, Marcus Schenk

Escape Earth!  If you have ever peered through a 100° eyepiece, you know the feeling of observing the cosmos without limits.  It’s as if you can find yourself a bit closer to the Universe.
The experience of such a feeling, to observe in such a way, has been made possible with our new  100° Panorama II Eyepieces. For any observer of course remains the question: What performance do these eyepieces offer?

The UK Magazine Sky at Night tested the Omegon Panorama 100° Eyepieces.  To our pleasure, they left an excellent impression!

Produkttest Omegon Panorama Okulare

The Panorama II 100° Eyepiece

Sky at Night: “Eyes even wider open”

In the May 2018 issue, the Astronomy magazine Sky at Night wrote extensively, how well the Panoramas have proven themselves in practice and awarded them with 4 out of 5 stars, with the addition of a hearty recommendation!

Two noteworthy quotes:

[… these Omegon Panorama II eyepieces will open up a whole new observing experience.]

[We enjoyed some wonderful views of the Moon and one clear night coincided with the appearance of the Lunar X and Lunar V that stood out stunningly using all four eyepieces.]

 

Auszeichnung Omegon Panorama

Read the entire article – free download – about the Omgon Panorama II Eyepieces.

High-value Telescope with Many Possibilities: 150-Mm Newton with New EQM-35 Mount by Skywatcher

September 14 2018, Marcus Schenk

Are you looking for a decently priced telescope to start out in astronomy that will not only impress you right from the start, but that will offer opportunities for many years? A Newton telescope on a mount with computer control is an excellent choice!

We are offering you the N 150/750 PDS Explorer BD EQM-35 PRO SynScan GoTo telescope by Skywatcher at the moment for only €998 – a complete system for astronomy for less than one thousand euros!

 

N 150 750 EQM-35

This mirror telescope, based on an idea by Isaac Newton, is an especially good value for the telescope structure. The main mirror, with a diameter of 150 mm, gathers enough light for visual observation. The relatively short focal length of 750 mm ensures that the tube is short. This means the telescope is easy to carry under a dark sky. The small focal length is also good for photography. The N 150/750 PDS Explorer piece of optical equipment for astrophotography is perfect, for example, for a high-quality eyepiece holder with reduction.

The computer-controlled EQM-35 mount by Skywatcher is a new and improved version of the classic EQ-3 with a higher load capacity. The special highlight of the EQM-35 is the removable declination axis:

 


EQmM-35

This means you can use the EQM-35 with a telescope or as a photo mount  with a SRL camera.

You can, of course, connect the same camera to the telescope. With this telescope, you can encapsulate the world of low-light, small objects astrophotografically, such as planetary nebulae and globular clusters. If you take off the telescope and disassemble the declination axis, you can make atmospheric wide-angle shots of the night sky with a photo lens.

In addition to purely visual observation with an eyepiece, these two photographic uses offer almost unlimited possibilities – and we haven’t even talked about photographing the moon and planets with a planetary camera. This telescope doesn’t restrict the ways in which you can experience your hobby of astronomy!

You can find more information here!

Infographic: Astronomy Highlights in Autumn 2018

August 31 2018, Marcus Schenk

Autumn brings cooler weather after the baking summer and we can look forward to long, starry nights once more. The night sky has some highlights for us, which we should definitely observe, even in the months of September, October and November.

Our new astronomical infographic ‘Astronomy highlights in autumn 2018’ provides a quick graphical overview – which will keep you up-to-date and in the know about what’s happening in the night sky.

The following text provides details about the various astronomical events we can look forward to.

 

September

01.09 Aurigids

The Aurigids is a fast meteor shower, with speeds of around 65 km/s. It originates from comet C/1911 Kiess. Around six meteors per hour are visible at shower’s maximum on September 1. The radiant, the region of sky where the meteors appear to come from, lies in the constellation of Auriga below the star Capella.

07.09. Neptune at opposition

The distant planet Neptune is once again at opposition to the Sun on the September 7. Make use of this opportunity to observe it. Neptune is a gas giant and is the outermost planet in the solar system. The light from Neptune, which is 4.5 billion kilometres away from the Earth, needs 4 hours and 10 minutes to reach us. You can find Neptune using binoculars – about halfway between the stars φ (phi) Aqr and λ (lambda) Aqr in the constellation of Aquarius. It appears as a greenish disc when observed in a telescope at 200-250 magnification.

08.09. Moon near Mercury

In the morning we experience a golden rising of Moon and Mercury. Just one day before the new Moon, the crescent moon is looking rather insubstantial. Below this we find Regulus and Mercury just above the horizon – about a hand width apart.

10.09. 21P/Giacorbini-Zinner

Comet 21P/Giacorbini-Zinner is at its closest approach to the Sun and also at its greatest brightness. With a predicted magnitude of 6.5, it has become an object for observing in any binoculars. Just one day after the new Moon is a great opportunity to observe this comet.

At the beginning of the month, it moved from the direction of Capella through the constellation of Auriga and on the 10th of September it was halfway between the Auriga stars Alnath and θ (Theta) Aur.

17.09 Moon near Saturn

Already by dusk we can observe Saturn above the ‘teapot’ of Sagittarius. The planet has become a familiar object, staying in the night sky throughout the summer. This evening it is joined by the Moon.

19.09. Moon near Mars

The Moon and the planet Mars are near one another this evening between Capricorn and Sagittarius.

21.09. The fiery splendour of Venus

Some people might think that the bright light on the horizon is an aircraft’s lights whereas, in fact, it is Venus. It is now a bright -4.9 mag object in the night sky. But the pleasure is short-lived – shortly after 8 pm it will disappear once again below the horizon.

21.09. Y cap occulted by the Moon

A star occultation can make an attractive visual observation – especially when a star visible in the telescope suddenly disappears as if by magic. The Moon will occult the star Y Cap with its dark edge at 9:40 pm on the 21st.

27.09. The star 73 Cet occulted by the Moon

Star ξ (Xi) cet in Cetus will be occulted tonight by the bright edge of the Moon. The star will disappear behind the Moon at 22:15 and reappear from its dark edge at 11:17 pm.

 

October

09.10. Draconids meteor shower

The Draconids is a meteor shower that seems to originate from the constellation of Draco. The maximum is expected on the 9th. Unfortunately, there is no prediction of the number of meteors we can expect. This can be very variable from year-to-year.

The radiant is located near the stars of the constellation Draco. The ‘dragon’ belongs to a circumpolar constellation, meaning the radiant is at an optimally visible elevation in the evening sky.

10.10. Moon near Jupiter

Just above the western horizon we can see a fragile crescent moon which is only 3% illuminated. On its left, we can see Jupiter. The planet will soon end its period of visibility and disappear from the night sky.

14.10. Moon near Saturn

The constellation of Sagittarius in October is already nearing the horizon, meaning summer is long gone and autumn has long since arrived. But at dusk we can catch a last taste of summer – Saturn and the Moon meet and go down together in the southwest in the evening sky.

18.10 Moon near Mars

A close meeting of the Moon and Mars takes place in the evening on 18.10. They are only about 3 degrees away from one another and pass the meridian at about 20:40.

17.10. ‘Small’ Moon

The Moon orbits the Earth in an ellipse – so it is sometimes closer and sometimes further away. Today, the Moon will reach apogee – that is, its distance 401,000 kilometres from Earth. This makes it appear smaller than when it is nearer the earth.

21.10. Orionids meteor shower

The Orionids is a smaller meteor shower with around 20 meteors per hour. The radiant is located in the constellation of Orion near the star Betelgeuse. Although you can watch the meteors throughout the month, the maximum is between October 20 and 21. An advantage this year is that this will fall just after the new Moon, so we can enjoy a particularly dark night. The best observing time will be between 10pm and 5am.

24.10. Uranus at opposition

Uranus is one of the remotest gas giants, only appearing as a tiny featureless greenish disc in a telescope. But it can still be identified as a planet. Locate Uranus by using a star map or, even easier, by using the Go-To system on your telescope. Then you can observe the planetary disc at around 150-200X magnification.

Although the bluish planet shines at a brightness of mag 5.6, it will be difficult to locate due to the phase of the Moon. It is worth waiting a few days and observing Neptune without the Moon making things difficult.

31.10. ‘Large’ Moon

If the Moon only had a very small apparent diameter in the sky on the 17th of October, it will now be the other way round this evening. Its elliptical orbit has now brought it to its nearest approach to the Earth. At only 367,000 kilometres away, it is now about 34,000 kilometres closer to us and has a much larger diameter of 32″.

 

November

06.11. Moon near Venus and Spica

If it is a clear night it is really worth getting up a bit earlier to enjoy a golden morning with an attractive coming together of the Moon, Venus and Spica. The Moon shows as a very thin crescent, only 2.4% illuminated. The next day brings a new Moon and the entire night is then perfect for deep sky observing.

11.11. Moon near Saturn

Because it gets dark so early at this time of the year, we can still catch a glimpse of Saturn and the Moon. They are close together at a distance of just one lunar diameter.

16.11. Moon near Mars

The small separation, about half a hand’s width, of the Moon and Mars can be admired on the evening of 16 November. Mars reaches the meridian at 18:45 CET before the Moon reaches it a little later.

17.11 Juno at opposition

Juno is a large asteroid in the asteroid belt with a diameter of 257 kilometers. It is now back at opposition to the Sun and appears as a quite bright 7.6 magnitude object. This makes it great even for observers who otherwise do not usually bother observing minor planets. Despite its brightness, Juno only shows as a point, making it indistinguishable from a star. A star map and coordinates for locating it are therefore useful – for example from recent magazines or from the Minor Planet Center.

17.11. Leonids meteor shower

The Leonids reach their maximum on the 17th of November. They are the most familiar known meteor shower after the Perseids. There have been years when their meteors fell in great numbers. This usually happens every 33 years when the earth collides with the Leonid cloud.

In normal years, the maximum currently reaches no more than 20 meteors per hour. The rate will be slightly lower this year, at about 15 meteors per hour. The bright Moon in the sky will detract from the shower this year. But if you’re looking for a good place to watch after midnight, then the Moon is only 12 degrees above the horizon and will no longer influence observing.

21.11. Comet 46P/Wirtanen

The short-period comet 46P/Wirtanen – with an orbital period of only 5.4 years – is currently the most promising candidate for naked eye observing. This comet, discovered in 1948, is currently moving towards the Sun, and will reach perihelion on December 12th, 2018. It will reach its very near minimum distance to the Earth – only 11.6 million kilometres – just a few days later.

We will get a foretaste of this comet already by November – it could achieve a brightness of magnitude 6 to 7 and so be easy to observe using binoculars. It describes a relatively small arc the night sky, staying very close to the horizon. We can find it to the right of the ‘river’ of Eridanus and below Cetus from about 20:00 CET.

23.11. Moon near Aldebaran

The full Moon can be observed near Aldebaran, the main star of the constellation Taurus, on the evening of the 23rd. It is a red giant, a 150 times brighter than the Sun. The name Aldebaran comes from the Arabic and means ‘leading star’ because it appears to precede the Pleiades.

30.11. Venus in all its splendour

Venus reaches its maximum brightness at magnitude -4.7. The brightness depends on the combination of its distance from the Earth and its current phase, and is now reaching its most favourable position. Venus can currently be admired as the ‘morning star’ and rises above the horizon after 4 AM. It reaches about 20 degrees above the horizon by 6:30 CET.

Enjoy your observing! We wish you clear skies!

PDF here

23.05.2019
We ship worldwide
Currency
Service
Advice
Contact
Universe2Go