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Archive for 2019

Blog Archives

The Celestron CPC 800 EdgeHD Now Available as an Affordable Moon-Set

April 18 2019, Stefan Taube

Get the Celestron CPC Deluxe 800 EdgeHD telescope in an affordable set with high-grade accessories now and experience lunar and planetary observation like never before!

Together with the telescope, the set comprises:

The scope of supply also includes an eyepiece with a focal length of 40 millimeters, which is very practical for gaining a general overview. It is, however, unsuitable for high magnification observation that is desired when observing the Moon and the planets. Therefore, the two Morpheus eyepieces make an excellent addition. The neutral density filter dims the dazzling moonlight and increases the contrast during lunar observations.

The entire set can be yours for only 3,709 €. Save 397 € compared to the manufacturer’s recommended retail price! Benefit from this unrivalled value for money offer now and observe not only the moon but also the Jupiter and Saturn oppositions this summer!

 

Celestron CPC 800 EdgeHD

Celestron SC 203/2032 CPC Deluxe 800 EdgeHD GoTo

 

For years this telescope has been a favourite among the beloved Celestron CPC Deluxe Family. The series offers compact Schmidt-Cassegrain-lenses with highly stable and easy to transport fork mounts. Thanks to the built-in GPS and the advanced computer control, you are good to go in no time – even without prior knowledge. Reach for the stars with the GoTo hand control box! Now you have all the fascinating celestial objects in the palm of your hand.

In the deluxe version of this series, Celestron merges telescopes with corrected EdgeHD lenses together with the CPC mount. So you can enjoy crystal clear images right until the edge of the field of view!

Our offer for the CPC Deluxe 800 EdgeHD set is valid until the end of September 2019!

iOptron mounts: A new addition to the CEM family

April 4 2019, Stefan Taube

CEM series mounts from iOptron are already widely used in the US and are becoming increasingly well known in Europe too. The CEM25P mount for portable astrophotography with Newtonian telescopes of up to 6 inches aperture and the CEM60 mount for use in observatories have proved particularly popular.

With their new CEM40 and CEM40-EC with encoders, iOptron now provides a middle range mount capable of carrying loads of up to 18 kilograms. The CEM40 is hence ideally suited for astrophotography with telescopes of up to 8 inches (200 millimetres) in aperture.

iOptron CEM40

The CEM40 is the latest addition to iOptron’s CEM series

The abbreviation CEM stands for centre-balance equatorial mount, i.e. for equatorial mounts which are supported at their centre of gravity. This design ensures an excellent relation between weight and carrying capacity. The CEM40 weighs only 7 kilograms and yet can carry OTAs up to 2.5 times heavier. The amazing carrying capacity of CEM mounts has been constantly reaffirmed by our customers – especially regarding the CEM25P.

The CEM40 comes equipped with an electronic pole finder, known as ‘iPolar’. A laptop is required to operate this however, so the CEM40 is particularly suitable for astrophotographers who already use a laptop for their camera. iPolar and built-in GPS provide easy and accurate alignment and GoTo computer control initialization.

The encoders installed in the CEM40-EC version ensure very high GoTo accuracy and allow worm gear permanent periodic error correction – a problem that all mounts suffer from. The CEM40-EC does away with the need for guiding with your astrophotography.

The CEM family now covers a wide range of load carrying capacities, offering a suitable model for every budget!

We are looking for a translator (m/f/d) for German – English

March 26 2019, Joshua Taboga

Thanks to our excellent customers, Astroshop is growing every year.  So, we are on the look-out for a new colleague, to join us with an enthusiasm for amateur Astronomy and would like to turn a hobby into a career!

We are looking for a translator (m/f/d) German – English

You will deal with the translation and proofreading of shop content and blog posts from German into English.

We expect:

  • Job experience in translation
  • English native speaker
  • Excellent knowledge of amateur Astronomy
  • About 10 hours/week
  • Open to new technology
  • Using of SDL Trados Studio a plus

We offer:

  • Interesting translation material
  • Fair compensation

Type of employment:
freelance

Place of work:
Home office or at our HQ in Landsberg am Lech or in our Munich office

More about the company behind Astroshop, nimax GmbH, is available at nimax.de.  We are happy to answer any questions or concerns: Anita Maier, HR, Tel: +49-(0)8191-94049-82.  If you would like to apply, send your application materials to jobs@nimax.de.

If you are interested in becoming part of our team, we look forward to hearing from you!  Apply now!

 

New: NB1 nebula filter from IDAS

March 25 2019, Stefan Taube

Luminescent emission nebulae, supernova remnants and planetary nebulae are all particularly beautiful objects pertaining to the night sky. This applies both to the simple process of visual observation, as well as to astrophotography. Nature illuminates such nebulae in specific spectral colours: the red light of hydrogen, the blue-green light of oxygen ions and also in the colours of sulphur and nitrogen ions.  Nebula filters enable these colours to pass through whilst blocking the diffused light of the natural luminance of the sky and of light pollution. The result is a marked increase in contrast.

With the Nebula Booster NB1, the filter specialists IDAS are introducing a new, very high-performing filter of this type onto the market, and one that is not overly expensive! As the transmission curve shows, the filter has high transmission and is permeable for all relevant spectral lines, with a surprisingly narrow passband: A real nebula intensifier!

Transmission curve IDAS NB1

 

The filter is ideal for photographing large nebula regions since it enables the typical colours of these objects to pass and blocks the disruptive skyglow. The filter quickly and completely cuts off near infrared up to 1100 nanometres. This is important since cameras are sensitive to this range, but telescopic lenses are optimised for the visible spectral range and are faulty in the infrared range.

IDAS Nebula Booster NB1

IDAS Nebula Booster NB1

 

The Nebula Booster NB1 is available with two versions which cover both of the common filter thread sizes and can be screw-fitted to the housings of eyepieces or cameras.

Spring offers: many binoculars and night vision devices specially reduced!

March 19 2019, Betty Lux

Spring is already in the starting blocks. We are ringing in the season with discounts – but only until 31 May 2019!

Both people and animals alike bask exuberantly in the first rays of spring sunshine. The birds are starting to sing again and plants are beginning to show new growth. Don’t miss one precious second of all this and grab yourself the right binoculars or night vision equipment in this sale!

We have heavily reduced, for example –

But prices have also been slashed on many other products for a limited time – including spotting scopes, microscopes and much more. We wish you lots of fun bargain hunting!

Find the Right Binoculars or Night Vision Device – New Models for 2019!

March 12 2019, Betty Lux

The new year has already arrived. Our binoculars and optical instrument suppliers are also making great headway with a wide range of innovations and new products –

whether bird or nature watching – you can’t go wrong with this all-rounder

Celestron‘s Trailseeker ED binoculars are a brand new article on the market. The popular and already available Trailseeker series  has now been extended with the use of high-quality ED glass. ED glass, also known as ‘Extra Low Dispersion Glass‘ reduces chromatic aberration to a minimum. That is a particular advantage when the lighting conditions are unfavourable, such as in the twilight. Despite it often being good weather in the Spring, it does still get dark quite early. But these binoculars will let you continue observing animals and birds well into the early evening. Savour every minute of your time outdoors in the countryside – your Trailseeker ED binoculars will help you!

Celestron Trailseeker ED 8×42

 

Speaking of the night: how about a night vision device?

Not without reason, the demand for night vision devices is higher than ever. Only a few years ago, these devices were not always particularly technically sophisticated, unwieldy and, most of all, expensive. Thankfully, those days are now over – as with the new Minox NVD 650 night vision device. The 6X magnification, with up to 30X digital zoom, allows you to see details in the dark. But what is really special is its range – with details still visible up to 350m away – putting the Minox NVD 650 firmly in the top echelon of 1st generation night vision devices! The photos and HD videos you take with it can be saved to a Micro-SD card and shown to friends and family later. And, last but not least, the device is really great value for money.

Minox NVD 650 night vision device

 

Hawke Frontier ED X – opens up an entire new world

At around 700 grams, Frontier ED X 10×42 binoculars from Hawke are ideally suitable for the discerning nature-watcher who doesn’t want to miss a thing. Here too, everything is down to the use of low dispersion ED glass together with an extremely compact design. The eyepieces can be pushed together to only 105mm separation. Those who find compact binoculars to be too small and unsophisticated will be more than satisfied with the Frontier ED X. They are nitrogen-filled to prevent fogging and equipped with a high-quality set of accessories, leaving nothing to be desired by the outdoor enthusiast.

AWKE Fernglas Frontier ED X 10x42

HAWKE Frontier ED X 10×42 binoculars

Explore all the new binoculars and optical instruments from reputable manufactures on our website and take advantage of our huge selection. Now is exactly the right time to buy, as availability is short but there is still sufficient stock. In any case, you are bound to enjoy some great moments nature watching!

 

Infographic: Astronomy Highlights Spring 2019

February 28 2019, Joshua Taboga

As the temperatures grow warmer, many stargazers are ready to head outside regularly again. In the spring, the sky shows us a completely different face. But what is there to see? What is worth looking for?

Your sky calendar for the next three months: The new astronomy infographic, “Highlights of the Spring Sky,” shows you what will be happening in the sky from March through May 2019, at a glance.

 

March

March 3: The Planet Chain – the Moon, Venus, Saturn and Jupiter at Dawn

A good reason to get up early: this morning, we can see the planets Jupiter, Saturn and Venus lined up like beads on a necklace. Starting at around 6 am, the Moon will peek up over the horizon and join the show. The constellations Scorpius and Sagittarius are the first heralds of summer, but it will be a long time before they are visible in the evening sky.

March 11: The Moon Meets Mars

To the naked eye or with binoculars, the Moon and Mars offer a pretty sight. They are close together, only 5 degrees apart. The Moon is just 5 days old today and shaped like a crescent.

March 16: The Golden Handle

A fascinating occurrence: the “Golden Handle” on the Moon. Like a handle made of light, it breaks through the Moonlit night just past the terminator. We can see Mare Imbrium near the Sinus Iridum crater and the tall Montes Jura range. This is where the Sun rises in the twilight zone. But while the crater is still in the dark, the Sun bathes the circular mountaintops of Montes Jura in sunlight. A golden ring in the darkness.

March 27: The Moon Meets Jupiter

Tonight, the Moon does not rise until after midnight. But it isn’t alone. It is accompanied by Jupiter, and they will travel together across the sky for the rest of the night. Jupiter will remain just below the Moon, about 50 arcseconds away.

 

 

April

April 5: Asteroid Iris in Opposition

Iris is one of the largest asteroids in the asteroid belt. This chunk of space rock has a diameter of 200 kilometers. On April 5 it will be in opposition to the Sun, reaching a brightness of 9.4 mag.

April 9: Asteroid Pallas in Opposition

The asteroid Pallas comes into opposition this month, reaching a brightness of 7.9 mag. Theoretically, it can be spotted with a pair of binoculars, and definitely with a telescope. But it appears as just another tiny dot among the stars. Between April 10 and 12, Pallas will pass by the 2.6-mag η Boötis – a great orientation point, because both objects appear in the same ocular field of view.

April 9: A Meeting of the Moon, Mars and Aldebaran

This evening the narrow crescent of the Moon will appear in the Taurus constellation, along with Mars and the constellation’s bright main star, Aldebaran.

April 11: Mercury’s Largest Western Elongation

Mercury orbits the Sun so quickly and so closely that we cannot always see it. But right now, Mercury has a large angle distance from the Sun at 27°. Still, it will be almost impossible to make out around daybreak.

April 12: Virginids

The Virginids are a meteor shower that come from the Virgo constellation. They show relatively little activity, with at most 5 shooting stars per hour. The best time to observe them is around midnight.

April 22: Lyrids

The Lyrids are a meteor shower that will produce just 10 to 20 meteors an hour at their peak on April 22. The best time to observe them is between 10 pm and 4 am; before midnight, we can enjoy the view without the disruptive Moon. The radiant, in other words the place where the shower begins, is located in the Lyra constellation.

April 25: The Moon Meets Saturn

Tonight, the Moon will pay another visit to the ringed planet. We can see this beautiful sight in the early morning hours, starting at around 3 am. Above it and to the right is the planet Jupiter, glowing with a brightness of -2.4 mag. The chain made up of these planets and the Moon offers a good opportunity to take beautiful atmospheric pictures.

 

May

May 6: Occultation of 61 Tau (For Experts)

The Moon’s path will lead through the Taurus constellation and the Hyades cluster, creating various interesting occultations with bright stars. This evening, the stars 61 Tau and 68 Tau will be hidden by the wafer-thin crescent Moon. One problem: the occultations will take place in the day sky or in the very early twilight sky, just above the horizon. At 7:18 pm CEST, the star 61 Tau (still in the day sky) will disappear on the unilluminated side of the Moon and reappear on the other side just under an hour later. Caution: at the time of the occultation, the Sun will still be in the sky. Do not stare at the Sun! Because it will still be daytime, the occultation cannot be seen from everywhere.
The next occultation, which can be observed from more southern regions, will be better: at 8:47 pm CET, the Moon will cover the star 68 Tau, and at 9:30 pm CET it will reappear on the other side.

May 8: The Moon Meets Mars

On the evenings of May 7 and 8, the Moon and Mars will come together. The Moon’s crescent will only be 8.8% illuminated, giving it a delicate look against the colorful evening sky. On the 7th the Red Planet will shine just 5 degrees above the Moon, and on the evening of the 8th the Moon will have overtaken Mars, moving from Taurus to the Gemini constellation.

May 18: Blue Moon

A “Blue Moon” has become defined as the point when we have a full Moon twice in one month.  However, the older definition of “Blue Moon” refers to the third full Moon out of four in one season and is called a Seasonal Blue Moon. Occurring about every 2.5 years, the name has nothing to do with the color of the Moon, which is the same for every full Moon.

May 20: The Moon Meets Jupiter

At 10:30 CEST, the Moon and Jupiter will cross the horizon and travel together through the second half of the night, until Sunrise. For most of the night, they will be the brightest objects in the sky. Venus only begins to shine in the East starting in the early morning.

A PDF of this infographic can be found HERE.

 

New focus motor for Celestron telescopes

February 26 2019, Stefan Taube

When it comes to astrophotography, the right focus is the most important thing. Even the best optics only deliver sharp images if the focus is spot on. A motorized focus has two advantages over manual focusing: it is vibration-free and very precise. If you remotely control your telescope via your PC, you definitely need motorization.

For the very popular SC telescopes of the Celestron brand, numerous solutions from different suppliers have been available. Celestron now offers its own model, the focus motor for SC and EdgeHD optics.

Celestron Fokussiermotor für SC- und EdgeHD-Optiken

Celestron focus motor for SC and EdgeHD optics.

The motor fits all SC, EdgeHD and RASA optics, as well as the two new Maksutovs with CGEM-II and CGX mounts. Exceptions are optics built before 2006 and the 9.25″ EdgeHD. An additional adapter is required for the RASA 1100, as the RASA 1100 is already supplied with a FeatherTouch micro-focus. The adapter requires you to dismantle the focuser partially to fit the motor.

If you are using a Celestron mount, power is simply supplied via the mount’s AUX port. A cable for this is included in the scope of delivery. If all AUX ports on your mount are already occupied, simply use the Celestron Aux Port Splitter.

The motor can be controlled in three ways:

  • With the NexStar+ controller: Simply press the MENU button, select Focuser and you can use the two arrow keys to control the motor and adjust its speed. Version 5.30+ of the installed firmware is required. You can update your Nexstar control via the Internet at any time. The controller is not only suitable for visual observation, but also for astrophotography with a DSLR, i.e. without a laptop.
  • With a laptop or PC: If you operate your telescope remotely or have connected an astrophotography camera, it is best to use the free program Celestron Focuser Utility for Windows. For this purpose, you need to connect the NexStar hand controller to the computer via USB, not the focus motor itself. The new CGX and CGX-L mounts can be controlled with the Celestron PWI software. The focuser can also be addressed via this program. The CGX and CGX-L mounts can be connected directly to the laptop or PC via USB without manual control.
  • Without a Celestron mount: If you have a Celestron optic mounted on another brand’s mount, you can control the focus motor via the USB port. The USB port should supply 900mA. As an alternative to the USB power supply, you can also operate the focus motor via main power or a Powertank. However, a power supply unit or power cable is not included in the scope of delivery.

The Celestron focus motor for SC and EdgeHD optics is a really useful accessory that is easy to adapt and operate.

Donation for Scope4SEN

February 12 2019, Anita Maier

Children with special educational needs and more vulnerable people should also be given the chance to look through a telescope and explore the Moon, the planets and the stars. Joanne & Patrick Poitevin took up the challenge to roll out the initiative Scope4SEN (Telescopes for Special Educational Needs) for the United Kingdom since end 2015. Schools for special educational needs and institutions for children with disabilities are donated a telescope, a binocular, and loads of education material through sponsorship.

https://patrickpoitevin.weebly.com/uploads/4/6/8/1/46815569/header_images/1478982112.jpg

Each school or institution who got this telescope will get the necessary support to use the telescope and all the material. So far they donated in 3 years about 600 telescopes, along with other educational material, such as binoculars, meteorites, SUNoculars, books, posters, magazines, stereoscopes, digital microscopes, planispheres, solar glasses, magnifiers, planetariums, CCD cameras, etc.

Picture

Once again, we have given support to this project at a value of 10,000 Euros and wish the association even more success in their endeavors!

 

Special Offer! The SUNocular 8×32 from Lunt

February 12 2019, Stefan Taube

Imagine a solar telescope that is just as manageable as a pair of binoculars, or a pair of binoculars that can be used to observe the sun as safely as if using a regular solar telescope. The SUNocular 8×32 from Lunt is precisely that. This unusual instrument for observing the sun is currently available at a special price of 98 euros. You will get 121 euros off the recommended retail price!

Lunt Sunocular

Lunt Solar Systems solar binoculars 8×32 SUNocular OD5

 

The SUNocular 8×32 features a permanently installed lens filter with a neutral density of 5, as is typical for sun filters designed for visual observation and allowing you to safely look at the sun. Since the filter is permanently installed, the SUNocular 8×32 is not suitable for use as binoculars for terrestrial observations. In order to ensure that there is no confusion on this point, we have classified this product under the Solar Telescope rubric for the sake of simplicity.

The SUNocular 8×32 allows you to see the photosphere of the sun. This layer, approximately 500 kilometres thick, creates almost all of the sun’s radiation in the visual spectral range. The photosphere shows sun spots with an eleven-year activity cycle.  We are currently between two cycles, and for this reason there are very few spots to be seen. But that will soon change, and this instrument allows you to be very well prepared when the change comes. You can observe, at any time and from any location, new sun spots appear as well as their day-to-day development.

The SUNocular 8×32 has all the typical features of a pair of binoculars of this size: central focus, dioptre balance, extremely rotatable eyepieces, carry strap and a very sturdy bag. Furthermore, the rubberised housing provides excellent grip!

By the way… The SUNocular 8×32 is also suitable for observing planets as they cross in front of the sun (transits) and for watching solar eclipses!

 

23.08.2019
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